Photography

Aubert, François (1829 - 1906)

The French painter settled in Mexico in 1860 and soon became the imperial court as well as the city’s bourgeoisie’s official photographer. Before returning to France in 1869, François Aubert managed to become the reporter of a major historical momentum. Unauthorized to photograph the execution of the emperor Maximilien on the 16th January 1867, François Aubert nonetheless symbolically depicted the event through the still-life photography of the dead tyran’s shirt hanging on a door. Although the dead body is not visible, the trivial piece of clothing stained with blood and pierced by bullets diffuses a macabre feel and evokes a shroud. A powerful abstract-like art piece, the intimate shirt strongly incarnates the dead man, almost with more humanity than if a corpse had been exhibited to the public eye. François Aubert about whom little is known, still created an iconic photography that inspired Edouard Manet and announced the beginnings of photojournalism.

François Aubert, Mexico Cathedral, 1865
François Aubert, Mexico Cathedral, 1865
François Aubert, Emperor Maximilian's shirt, date unknown
François Aubert, Emperor Maximilian's shirt, date unknown
François Aubert, Execution squad standing at Ease June, 1867
François Aubert, Execution squad standing at Ease June, 1867
François Aubert, Family Portrait, 1864-1869
François Aubert, Family Portrait, 1864-1869
François Aubert, Emperor Maximilian in his coffin at Queretaro, Mexico, 1867
François Aubert, Emperor Maximilian in his coffin at Queretaro, Mexico, 1867
François Aubert
François Aubert
François Aubert
François Aubert
François Aubert
François Aubert
close

Share this picture on